Connect with us

Hi, what are you looking for?

Bnreport Business News Report

Health

Daytime Wounds May Heal Faster Than Nighttime Ones

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 8, 2017 (HealthDay News) — Your internal body clock is the reason why wounds heal faster if an injury occurs during the day rather than at night, new research suggests.

Experiments with skin cells and other cells in mice showed that daytime wounds healed about twice as fast as nighttime wounds.

Then, when analyzing the wound recovery for 118 people with burn injuries, the researchers found that wounds that had occurred at night took 60 percent longer to heal than those that had occurred during the day.

The body clock, also called your circadian rhythm, regulates wound healing by skin cells and optimizes healing during the day, the researchers concluded. They added that this could prove helpful for surgery and other medical procedures and might also lead to new drugs to improve wound healing.

“We've shown that the daily cycles in our body clock control how well cells can repair damaged tissue by affecting an essential protein called actin,” said lead author Ned Hoyle, with the Medical Research Council Laboratory of Molecular Biology in Cambridge, England.

“Efficient repair of our skin is critical to preventing infection, and when healing goes wrong, wounds can become chronic or excessive scarring can occur,” Hoyle said in a medical research council news release.

“Further research into the link between body clocks and wound healing may help us to develop drugs that prevent defective wound healing or even help us to improve surgery outcomes,” Hoyle added.

The study was published Nov. 8 in the journal Science Translational Medicine.

More information

The U.S. National Institute of General Medical Sciences has more on the body clock.

Let's block ads! (Why?)

Original Article

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 8, 2017 (HealthDay News) — Your internal body clock is the reason why wounds heal faster if an injury occurs during the day rather than at night, new research suggests. Experiments with skin cells and other cells in mice showed that daytime wounds healed about twice as fast as nighttime wounds. Then, when analyzing the wound recovery for 118 people with burn injuries, the researchers found that wounds that had occurred at night took 60 percent longer to heal than those that had occurred during the day. The body clock, also called your circadian rhythm, regulates wound healing by skin cells and optimizes healing during the day, the researchers concluded. They added that this could prove helpful for surgery and other medical procedures and might also lead to new drugs to improve wound healing. "We've shown that the daily cycles in our body clock control how well cells can repair damaged tissue by affecting an essential protein called actin," said lead author Ned Hoyle, with the Medical Research Council Laboratory of Molecular Biology in Cambridge, England. "Efficient repair of our skin is critical to preventing infection, and when healing goes wrong, wounds can become chronic or excessive scarring can occur," Hoyle said in a medical research council news release. "Further research into the link between body clocks and wound healing may help us to develop drugs that prevent defective wound healing or even help us to improve surgery outcomes," Hoyle added. The study was published Nov. 8 in the journal Science Translational Medicine. More information The U.S. National Institute of General Medical Sciences has more on the body clock. Let's block ads! (Why?) Original Article

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 8, 2017 (HealthDay News) — Your internal body clock is the reason why wounds heal faster if an injury occurs during the day rather than at night, new research suggests.

Experiments with skin cells and other cells in mice showed that daytime wounds healed about twice as fast as nighttime wounds.

Then, when analyzing the wound recovery for 118 people with burn injuries, the researchers found that wounds that had occurred at night took 60 percent longer to heal than those that had occurred during the day.

The body clock, also called your circadian rhythm, regulates wound healing by skin cells and optimizes healing during the day, the researchers concluded. They added that this could prove helpful for surgery and other medical procedures and might also lead to new drugs to improve wound healing.

"We've shown that the daily cycles in our body clock control how well cells can repair damaged tissue by affecting an essential protein called actin," said lead author Ned Hoyle, with the Medical Research Council Laboratory of Molecular Biology in Cambridge, England.

"Efficient repair of our skin is critical to preventing infection, and when healing goes wrong, wounds can become chronic or excessive scarring can occur," Hoyle said in a medical research council news release.

"Further research into the link between body clocks and wound healing may help us to develop drugs that prevent defective wound healing or even help us to improve surgery outcomes," Hoyle added.

The study was published Nov. 8 in the journal Science Translational Medicine.

More information

The U.S. National Institute of General Medical Sciences has more on the body clock.

Let's block ads! (Why?)

Original Article

Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You May Also Like

Politics

Sed ut perspiciatis unde omnis iste natus error sit voluptatem accusantium doloremque laudantium, totam rem aperiam, eaque ipsa quae.

Finance

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua.

Tech

Enlarge/ You wouldn't really want to use Nvidia's ..

Finance

Neque porro quisquam est, qui dolorem ipsum quia dolor sit amet, consectetur, adipisci velit, sed quia non numquam eius modi tempora.

%d bloggers like this: