Science

What happens after you die? A team of researchers in New York may have come close to solving this mystery. Theyve concluded that one remains fully conscious at the time of death.

Previously, skeptics would brush aside claims of near-death experiences and often ascribe these to physiological and psychological factors. However, in a study, researchers have found that a persons consciousness does remain working after the body has died and ceased showing signs of life.

In other words, the person is aware that theyre dead. If that person is in a hospital room, he/she can even hear doctors announcing their death.

Illustration – Shutterstock | l i g h t p o e t

There was a film released in the 90s called Flatliners, where five medical students deliberately stopped their hearts for short periods of time to experience the afterlife. Well, a team of researchers from New York University Langone School of Medicine also looked into that very same question.

The team studied patients who had been resuscitated in Europe and in the United States, who were brought back to life after suffering a cardiac arrest (or heart attack).

“Technically speaking, thats how you get the time of death—its all based on the moment when the heart stops,” NYUs director of critical care and resuscitation research, Dr. Sam Parnia, told Live Science. “Once that happens, blood no longer circulates to the brain, which means brain function halts almost instantaneously.”

Illustration – Shutterstock | sfam_photo

However, according to Dr. Parnia, many of the resuscitated patients detailed experiences of hearing and seeing what was going on around them, even after they were pronounced dead.

“Theyll describe watching doctors and nurses working and theyll describe having awareness of full conversations, of visual things that were going on, that would otherwise not be known to them,” Dr. Parnia said.

Illustration – Shutterstock | Tyler Olson

Their stories were later verified by medical and nursing staff present on the scene. Dr. Parnia and his team are continually investigating what exactly happens after death.

“Were trying to understand the exact features that people experience when they go through death, because we understand that this is going to reflect the universal experience werRead More – Source

Science

Contrary to the popular narrative that the polar bear population is falling as a result of shrinking Arctic sea ice, Inuit groups claim the species is thriving, according to federal affidavits submitted in court.

“Inuit have not noticed a significant decline in the health of the polar bears,” the Nunavik Marine Region Wildlife Boards director of wildlife management wrote in court papers, reported Blacklocks Reporter.

“In fact Nunavik Inuit report that it is rare to see a skinny bear and most bears are observed to be healthy,” the affidavit read.

Inuit groups submitted the documents after Environment Canada called for hunting quotas of the polar bear to be slashed, citing “conservation concerns.”

According to the International Union for the Conservation of Nature, there are around 22,000 to 31,000 polar bears worldwide at present, and the bears are listed as a vulnerable species.

For years, organizations such as the World Wildlife Fund (WWF) have cited the predicted decline of the polar bear population as an inevitable consequence of global warming. It estimated that global polar bear numbers will fall by 30 percent by 2050.

Similarly, a 2016 study on global polar bear numbers estimated the the global polar bear population could decline by more than 30 percent in as little as 35 years. Researchers looked at the effect of climate change on the Arctic Ocean and calculated the likelihood of the projected population drop as 71 percent. Thats because polar bears stand on Arctic sea ice when hunting for seals.

However, the federal affidavits claim residents in Nunavik, northern Canada, have seen an increase in the polar bear population, and “a particularly notable increase since the 1980s.” Twelve of the worlds polar bear subpopulations are mainly found in the region.

The Nunavik Marine Region Wildlife Board report contains quotes from a hunter saying that polar bears are “not going extinct” and that there is no shortage.

The report read: “Many participants were very concerned about perspectives from outside Nunavik that polar bears are endangered elsewhere.”

“All interviews conducted in the Southern Hudson Bay communities shared the view the population grew somewhat from the 1960s until the 1980s, and that a continued increase has been very noticeable since that time.”

Controversial Viral Polar Bear Video

A polar bear monitor, Leo Ikakhik, explained that a viral video of a starving polar bear may not be what it seems.

“I wasnt totally surprised. These things happen,” he told the CBC. “Mother Nature is going to do part of that. You know, its just part of the cycle.”

The emaciated bear captured the attention of millions of people as it rummaged through trash to search for food.

“This is what Read More – Source

Science

The journey of Dr. M. Stanley Whittingham to the Chemistry Nobel Prize

BINGHAMTON, N.Y.—In the corner of the hall on the second floor of the Innovative Technologies Complex campus at Binghamton University, theres an office decorated with balloons. A modest way to celebrate Dr. M. Stanley Whittinghams 2019 Chemistry Nobel Prize.

Now 78 years old, Whittingham is still excited about batteries, visiting laboratories, and giving lectures around the globe.

“So people say, When are you going to retire?'” Whittingham said. And hell reply, “I like what Im doing. Im gonna keep doing it.”

And his wife, Dr. Georgina Whittingham, who is a professor of foreign languages, says the same.

“We keep teaching,” he said. “And my doctor says, Dont retire.'”

For more than 30 years, Whittingham has been working at Binghamton University in different positions. Currently, hes a distinguished professor of Chemistry and Materials Science and Engineering.

Its a place he loves.

“Theres a lot more teamwork here,” he said.

Hes a busy man—even more so since being announced as a key figure in history. What won him the Nobel Prize was that he was the first to develop the lithium battery in the 1970s at Exxon.

British at Heart

He came from a small town—Lincolnshire, England—where his high-school teacher got him excited about chemistry.

“Those days, you could make chemicals, blow things up, and things that you are not allowed to do,” he said with a laugh. “So I got excited about chemistry.”

He then made it to Oxford and finished his B.A., M.A., and Ph.D.

At the end of his Ph.D., unlike many colleagues who went to North America and Canada, he decided to go to Stanford University.

“I wanted to go somewhere with sunshine,” he said with a laugh. “Im still British at heart.”

After being there for two months, he was asked to take charge of the material labs of the Department of Defense for the next two years.

“Very successful time, I should say. During those two years, something even more important happened,” Whittingham said. “I met my wife at Stanford.”

“We didnt waste any time. Within, I think, nine months, we were married.”

Next-Generation Batteries

After finishing his postdoctoral research in two years, he went to work for Exxon.

“I was hired to work on energy, but not petroleum or chemicals,” he said.

With a keen interest in solar energy and fuel cells, he started researching batteries.

“We wanted to build the next-generation battery,” he said. “The big interest was electronic vehicles because of the gas crisis in the U.S.”

So they started building batteries in test tubes. At that time, they didnt have any unique environment, advanced machines, or even theories on what they might discover.

“We knew there was something there. We didnt know how big it would be.”

Whittingham never thought his invention would change the world.

“Even 15 years ago, the phone, youd need a whole briefcase to carry it. And I think lithium batteries helped all these little devices.”

In the 1980s, John Goodenough, using the foundation that Whittingham laid, made another breakthrough to even more powerful batteries.

With a physicists eyes, Goodenough set out to test something that they thought wouldnt work, Whittingham said.

Following that, in 1985, Akira Yoshino created the first commercially viable lithium-ion battery.

After decades, these three scientists who changed the world have been recognized with the 2019 Chemistry Nobel Prize.

And its all about perseverance.

Read More – Source

Science

The Space Exploration Technologies Corporation, SpaceX, is planning to send 30,000 new Starlink broadband satellites into the sky in a bid to meet future demands for fast and reliable internet, TechCrunch reports.

Elon Musks company recently filed the request with the International Telecommunication Union, which governs international use of global bandwidth. The proposal is anticipated to be affirmed soon, according to the report.

The company already has permission to launch 12,000 new satellites into space and hopes the extra satellites will responsibly “meet users anticipated needs.”

A SpaceX spokesperson told the publication: “As demand escalates for fast, reliable internet around the world, especially for those where connectivity is non-existent, too expensive or unreliable, SpaceX is taking steps to responsibly scale Starlinks total network capacity and data density to meet the growth in users anticipated needs.”

The publication says SpaceX is hoping to launch hundreds of satellites in the coming year as it anticipates a considerable demand for highly-optimized broadband globally.

However, the service will initially be provided to the northern U.S., as well as parts of Canada, from as early as next year, when the network goes live.

It will reportedly take up to 24 launches of Starlink satellites for SpaceX to be able to provide global coverage. It will not be operating all of its satellites in the same orbital region.

The company is also taking specific measures to avoid additional issues with traffic, such as building an automated collision avoidance system, structuring de-orbiting plans, and sharing information about the orbital routes of their satellites.

It is also said to be turning back around all the Earth-facing Starlink satellites to minimize reflected light. Astronomers and space watchers are worried that a build-up of satellites may impact scientific observation and research.

SpaceX said it is meeting or exceeding all of the industry standards that have been established so far.

Earlier this year, in May, the company deployed 60 of its Starlink satellites from its Falcon 9 rocket, which launched from Cape CRead More – Source

Science

The journey of Dr. M. Stanley Whittingham to the Chemistry Nobel Prize

BINGHAMTON, NEW YORK—In the corner of the hall on the second floor of the Innovative Technologies Complex campus, there is an office decorated with balloons. A modest way to celebrate Dr. M. Stanley Whittinghams 2019 Chemistry Nobel Prize.

Now 78 years old, Whittingham is still excited about batteries, visiting laboratories, and giving lectures all around the globe.

“So people say, When are you going to retire?,” said Whittingham. And he will reply, “I like what Im doing. Im gonna keep doing it.”

And his wife, Dr. Georgina Whittingham, who is a professor of foreign languages, says the same.

“We keep teaching,” he said. “And my doctor says dont retire.”

For more than 30 years, Whittingham has been working at Binghamton University in different positions. Currently, he is a Distinguished Professor of Chemistry and Materials Science and Engineering.

It is a place he loves.

“Theres a lot more teamwork here,” he said.

A busy man, even more so since being announced as a key figure in history. What won him the Nobel Prize is that he was the first to develop the lithium battery in the 1970s at Exxon.

British at Heart

Coming from a little town—Lincolnshire, England—his high school teacher got him excited about chemistry.

“Those days, you could make chemicals, blow things up, and things that you are not allowed to do,” he said with a laugh. “So, I got excited about chemistry.”

He then made it to Oxford and finished his B.A., M.A., and Ph.D.

At the end of his Ph.D., unlike many colleagues who went to North America and Canada, he decided to go to Stanford University.

“I want to go somewhere with sunshine,” he said with a laugh. “I am still British at heart.”

After being there for two months, he was asked to take charge of the material labs of the Department of Defense for the next two years.

“Very successful time, I should say. During those two years, something even more important happened,” Whittingham said. “I met my wife at Stanford.”

“We didnt waste any time, within I think nine months we were married.”

Next-Generation Batteries

After finishing his postdoctoral research in two years, he went to work for Exxon.

“I was hired to work on energy, but not petroleum or chemicals,” he said.

With a keen interest in solar energy and fuel cells, he started researching batteries.

“We wanted to build the next-generation battery,” he explained. “The big interest was electronic vehicles because of the gas crisis in the U.S.”

So they started building batteries in test tubes. At that time, they didnt have any unique environment, advanced machines, or even theories on what they might discover.

“We knew there was something there. We didnt know how big it would be.”

Whittingham never thought his invention would change the world.

“Even 15 years ago, the phone, youd need a whole briefcase to carry it. And I think lithium batteries helped all these little devices.”

In the 1980s, John Goodenough, using the foundation that Whittingham laid, made another breakthrough to even more powerful batteries.

With a physicists eyes, Goodenough set out to test something that they thought wouldnt work, Whittingham said.

Following that, in 1985, Akira Yoshino created the first commercially viable lithium-ion battery.

After decades, these three scientists who changed the world have been recognized with the 2019 Chemistry Nobel Prize.

And it all about perseverancRead More – Source

Science

A biotech delegation organized by Metal Industries Research and Development Centre and six high-tech medical equipment manufacturers (Medimaging Integrated Solution, Brain Navi Biotechnology Co, Advanced Biomedical Technology, General Biologicals Corporation, North-vision Technology, and Phalanx Biotech Group), led by Deputy Director-General Shu-Chu Chen of the Hsinchu Science Park Bureau, Ministry of Science and Technology, went to Tokyo for a business matching fair on Oct. 23, 2019.

To enhance bilateral business ties and extend mutual market niches, the matching fair provided a one-on-one forum on Oct. 24. Participants of the fair from Japan included more than 10 Japanese companies from business and social care organizations.

Participants of the fair gave positive feedback on the bilateral interaction.

Doctor Nakagawa Shiro, also a member of the WTO Trade Dispute Resolution Committee and a distinguished Professor of Nagoya City University, expressed that the event held the most successful and terrific interaction he has ever seen between Japan and Taiwan.

1. Warm interaction in the matching fair between Japanese and Taiwanese manufacturers
A warm interaction at the matching fair between Japanese and Taiwanese manufacturers. (Metal Industries Research & Development Centre)

Delegates from the Hsinchu Science Park included companies engaged in medical devices such as digital medicine, medical imaging, 3D printing, precision medicine, and precision detection.

(L to R): Director of Taipei Science and Culture Representative Office Science and Technology Group, Mr. Jun-Rong Chen, Deputy Director-General of the Hsinchu Science Park Bureau, Ms. Shu-Zhu Chen, Distinguished Professor of Nagoya City University, Professor Naoya Shiro. (Metal Industries Research & Development Centre)

Companies in Japan that participated in the fair included manufacturers of shock sensors, medical imaging information, in vitro testing, clinical reagents, pharmaceutical services, frontend components, and venture capital firms.

The participating companies gained potential business opportunities for further interactions.

The Hsinchu Science Park Bureau also hosted a bilateral interaction banquet on the evening of Oct. 24 to enhance Japan-Taiwan business ties.

Deputy Director-General Chen of the Hsinchu Science Park Bureau stated that TaRead More – Source

Science

BEIJING/SHANGHAI—China dumped a total of 200.7 million cubic meters of waste into its coastal waters in 2018, a 27 percent rise on the previous year and the highest level in at least a decade, the countrys environment ministry said on Oct. 29.

The majority of the waste was dumped in the delta regions of the Yangtze and Pearl rivers, both major industrial zones on Chinas eastern coast, the Ministry of Ecology and Environment (MEE) said.

“At the moment, there are some clear problems with the work on the marine ecological environment, with some regions not showing a lot of awareness or paying sufficient attention, and lacking strong initiative and dedication,” Huo Chuanlin, deputy director of the MEEs marine environment department, said at a briefing in Beijing.

Environmental groups have expressed concern that China, desperate to clean up its own rivers, is dumping increasing amounts of trash in its seas instead.

Of the 8.8 million tons of plastic waste that flows down the worlds “small first order streams to large rivers that discharge to the sea,” the “top ten” polluting rivers account for 88-95 percent of plastics that flow each year into the worlds oceans.

The six Chinese rivers on the “top ten” list—the Yangtze, Yellow, Hai, Pearl, the Amur that borders Russia, and the headlands of the Mekong River—account for about 3.8 million tons, or almost half of the worlds plastic flow into the oceans. The Yangtze alone accounts for 1.6 million tons of plastic discharged into the oceans.

China found an average of 24 kilograms of floating trash per 1,000 square meters of surface water last year, 88.7 percent of which was plastic, the ministry said. Plastic also dominated the waste found below the surface, including on the seabed.

Earlier this year, Beijing published an action plan deRead More – Source

Science

WASHINGTON—The Pentagons secretive X-37B spaceplane landed in Florida on Sunday after a record-long orbital flight lasting more than two years, the U.S. Air Force said. It caps the latest test mission for an array of military technologies.

The unpiloted X-37B, built by Boeing Co., touched down on an airstrip at NASAs Kennedy Space Center at 3:51 a.m. ET after spending 780 days orbiting Earth as the Air Forces fifth flight mission under the Orbital Test Vehicle program, the Air Force said.

The spaceplane, roughly the size of a small bus and sharing many design features with NASAs Space Shuttle, was sent into orbit in 2017 atop a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket. The mission was managed by the Washington-based Air Force Rapid Capabilities Office to conduct various classified technology experiments in a long-duration space environment.

“The X-37B continues to demonstrate the importance of a reusable spaceplane,” Barbara Barrett, the newly appointed Air Force secretary, said in a statement. “Each successive mission advances our nations space capabilities.”

The previous X-37B mission lasted 718 days and landed in 2017. Sunday mornings landing tallies 2,865 total days for the program overall, the Air Force said.

The Pentagon, increaRead More – Source

Science

ROTTERDAM, Netherlands—Dutch inventor Boyan Slat is widening his effort to clean up floating plastic from the Pacific Ocean by moving into rivers, too, using a new floating device to catch garbage before it reaches the seas.

The 25-year-old university dropout founded The Ocean Cleanup to develop and deploy a system he invented when he was 18 that catches plastic waste floating in the ocean.

On Oct. 26, he unveiled the next step in his efforts: A floating solar-powered device that he calls the “Interceptor,” which scoops plastic out of rivers as it drifts past.

“We need to close the tap, which means preventing more plastic from reaching the ocean in the first place,” he said, calling rivers “the arteries that carry the trash from land to sea.”

Slats organization has drawn criticism in the past for focusing only on the plastic trash already floating in the worlds oceans.

Experts say that some 9 million tons of plastic waste, including plastic bottles, bags, toys, and other items, flow annually into the ocean from beaches, rivers, and creeks.

Three of the machines are already deployed to Indonesia, Malaysia, and Vietnam—with a fourth heading to the Dominican Republic, he said.

Izham Hashim from the government of Selangor state in Malaysia was present at the launch and said he was happy with the machine.

“It has been used for one and a half months in the river and its doing very well, collecting the plastic bottles and all the rubbish,” he said.

Slat said he believes 1,000 rivers are responsible for some 80 percent of plastic pouring into the worlds oceans, and he wants to tackle them all in the next five years.

“This is not going to be easy, but imagine if we do get this done,” he told an audience of enthusiastic supporters, who whooped, clapped, and cheered at his announcement. “We could truly make our oceans clean again.”

The vessel is designed to be moored in rivers and is shaped to deflect larger floating debris such as tree trunks.

He used his live-streamed unveiling to seek the support of countries committing to clean up their rivers, and businesses that are prepared to inject funding and help with the operation of the devices.

The interceptors work by guiding plastic waste into an opening in its bow. A conveyor belt then carries the trash into the guts of the machine, where its dropped into dumpsters. The interceptor sends a text message to local operators to empty it when its full.

SlaRead More – Source

Science

Scientists are hailing this prehistoric dinosaur as the “best-preserved dinosaur on Earth.” In fact, it is so well preserved that it cannot be defined as a fossil. This magnificent ancient 18-foot-long specimen has been called a genuine “dinosaur mummy.”

اس پر ‏‎Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology‎‏ نے شائع کیا جمعہ، 10 مئی، 2019

On May 12, 2017, the Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology in Alberta, Canada, unveiled a dinosaur exhibit: “We dont just have a skeleton,” Caleb Brown, a researcher at the museum, told National Geographic. “We have a dinosaur as it would have been.”

Since it was unearthed, it has kept its shape; its bones arent visible and even some of its innards are still intact. Researchers were amazed at the extent of the almost unparalleled degree of preservation.

The dinosaur is so well preserved that it “might have been walking around a couple of weeks ago,” Jakob Vinther, a paleobiologist from the University of Bristol, said. “Ive never seen anything like this.”

اس پر ‏‎Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology‎‏ نے شائع کیا جمعرات، 3 اگست، 2017

The creature was first discovered in 2011 when an oil mine employee named Shawn Funk inadvertently discovered the specimen while at work.

While Funk was excavating that day, he was surprised to find something he had never discovered in 12 years of digging. In the afternoon, Funks excavators claw struck something different. He and his supervisor, Mike Gratton, started to wonder what these strange-colored lumps were. They questioned if these were fossilized wood or an animals ribs?

“Right away, Mike was like, We gotta get this checked out,” Funk said in a 2011 interview. “It was definitely nothing we had ever seen before.” Surprisingly, this wasnt fossilized wood or a petrified tree stump but a fossilized dinosaur.

From its finding, it took researchers six years and around 7,000 hours to conduct tests on the evidence collected and prepare the remnants to be displayed at the Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology.

A remarkably intact dinosaur glares back at us, thanks to a long-vanished sea in Alberta.

اس پر ‏‎The New York Times‎‏ نے شائع کیا جمعہ، 12 مئی، 2017

Over 100 million years ago, when this ancient prehistoric creature roamed the earth, it was a member of a newly discovered species and genus named the Nodosaur.

According to paleontologists, this bizarre fossil was the first of its kind. Usually, its rare to find a fossil that keeps its soft tissue in its true shape. Its common to see bones and teeth well preserved. So indeed, this was an amazing discovery.

It was a gigantic four-legged herbivore, and its body was protected by spiky, plated “armor.” This nodosaur originally weighed around 3,000 pounds (approx. 1,361 kg) when it was alive. The mummified nodosaur is so unimpaired that it still weighs 2,500 pounds (approx. 1,134 kg)! Truly marvelous!

When the museum put up pictures of the dinosaur on their Facebook page, one curious user commented: “What was its favorite plant to eat? Was it prone to calm then hissing and snapping like a turtle when provoked, or was its demeanor different? Can you tell if its male or female?”

Join Dr. Henderson on @CTVCalgary today at noon for insights on some of the amazing specimens in our new exhibit Grounds for Discovery.

اس پر ‏‎Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology‎‏ نے شائع کیا جمعرات، 31 اگست، 2017

To which Brown replied: “1) We dont know what its favorite plant food was. We do know that it would have enjoyed plants growing close to the ground, as it would not have been able to reach very high up. Hopefully, analysis of the stomach contents will allow us to determine the last plants that it ate. 2) We dont know what its demeanor was like. It would have probably been slow moving, but we are unsure if it was a gentle giant or was defensive, snapping creature. 3) We also dont know if it was male or female. OutsideRead More – Source