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Fires twice the size of the UK destroyed for soy and palm oil production

Undated handout photo issued by Greenpeace of a deforested area in Matopiba in Brazil as an area twice the size of the UK will have gone between 2010 and 2020 despite pledges by global brands to end deforestation, Greenpeace claims. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Issue date: Tuesday June 11, 2019. In 2010 members of the Consumer Goods Forum, which include major global brands, committed to net-zero deforestation by 2020 though ?sustainable sourcing of key commodities including soy, palm oil, paper and pulp, and cattle. See PA story ENVIRONMENT Forests. Photo credit should read: Marizilda Cruppe/Greenpeace/PA Wire NOTE TO EDITORS: This handout photo may only be used in for editorial reporting purposes for the contemporaneous illustration of events, things or the people in the image or facts mentioned in the caption. Reuse of the picture may require further permission from the copyright holder.
A forest in Matopiba in Brazil shows the scale of deforestation, according to Greenpeace (Picture: PA)

An area of forest twice the size of the UK will have been destroyed within a decade for products such as palm oil and soy, experts have said.

Vast swathes of trees are being cleared as people worldwide are consuming more meat and products containing palm oil.

Environmentalists have called on big businesses to do much more, saying the world is risking an ecological catastrophe.

Anna Jones, global campaign lead for forests at Greenpeace UK, said: These companies are destroying our childrens future by driving us towards climate and ecological collapse.

In 2010, members of the Consumer Goods Forum – which includes major global brands – committed to net-zero deforestation by 2020.

They aimed to achieve this through sustainable sourcing of key commodities including soy, palm oil, paper and pulp, and cattle.

But a report from Greenpeace suggests that at least 50 million hectares (124 million acres) of forests across the world will have been lost in the decade to 2020 as a result of growing production and consumption of agricultural commodities.

Undated handout photo issued by Greenpeace of forest clearance and plantation development in PT Megakarya Jaya Raya (PT MJR) oil palm concession in Papua as an area twice the size of the UK will have gone between 2010 and 2020 despite pledges by global brands to end deforestation, Greenpeace claims. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Issue date: Tuesday June 11, 2019. In 2010 members of the Consumer Goods Forum, which include major global brands, committed to net-zero deforestation by 2020 though ?sustainable sourcing of key commodities including soy, palm oil, paper and pulp, and cattle. See PA story ENVIRONMENT Forests. Photo credit should read: Ulet Ifansasti/Greenpeace/PA Wire NOTE TO EDITORS: This handout photo may only be used in for editorial reporting purposes for the contemporaneous illustration of events, things or the people in the image or facts mentioned in the caption. Reuse of the picture may require further permission from the copyright holder.
Vast swathes of forests are being cleared for meat, soy and palm oil (Picture: PA)

The report said that since 2010, the area planted with soy in Brazil has increased by 45% and Indonesian palm oil production is up 75%.

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It warns global meat consumption is set to rise by 76% by 2050, while soy production is forecast to increase by nearly 45% and palm oil by 60%.

Meat and dairy production is a big driver of forest destruction as trees are cleared for grazing land and to grow crops such as soy, which are used in industrial feed.

Greenpeace says it wrote to more than 50 companies early in 2019 asking them to demonstrate how they were achRead More – Source
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